Liminaria aims at narrating the territory of Fortore, a marginal rural region located in the South of Italy, through an artistic point of view, putting together the ability of digital storytelling and the approach of different disciplines (literature, sociology, aesthetics, antrophology, economy) and different fields of investigations (design, oenogastronomy).

Art in this context is seen as a research tool that combines different languages in order to form its own, and that is “ready to get out of its own proximity without declining the idea of inhabiting a place” (F. Casetti), building a dimension that is “Glocal” par excellence.

Liminaria is a platform in which stories of places, people and landscapes come together through the hybridization and the convergence of modalities, languages and different tools (sound, video, photography and literature). Liminaria looks at creating a narrative that will give a new perspective to cultural, social, natural, architectural and landscape elements of the land, by having local communities teaming up with artists, curators, researcher, writers, and specialists of new technology.

At the same time, Liminaria attempts to conceive an aesthetic experiment that, through new art, communication and design, is able to portray the territory in an unexpected way, giving it an innovative twist and new connotations.

The first edition of Liminaria featured three artists active in different disciplines (sound and writing) in a week residency (Tessa Elieff, France Jobin and Isabella Pedicini) spent in the two villages of San Marco dei Cavoti and Molinara.

The invited artists focused their attention on a series of cultural, social, architectural, natural and landscape elements, having a direct connection with the places and the inhabitant that allowed them to recognize, narrate and give form to the identity of the territory they had worked on.

The final live show on the 28th of June in San Marco dei Cavoti gave the opportunity to the artists to present the results of the residency through their own vision of the territory.